1.30.2013

                   
Pin It
   
   

Widgets

Consider Your Mind Blown. The Phenomenally Realistic Graphite Drawings of Kelvin Okafor.



above: graphite drawing in progress by Kelvin Okafor

Kelvin Okafor describes himself as a "Passionate penciled artist. Highly interested in detail and precision." I'd say that's an understatement once you see the phenomenally realistic graphite drawings created by this UK Illustrator. As astounding as the finished pieces are (it's truly difficult to discern whether or not they are photographs until you look extremely closely), the evolution of the drawings shown on his blog, and as videos on his YouTube channel, will blow your mind.


above, clockwise from top left: Timeless, Undeviating and Mana drawings by Kelvin Okafor

I'm sharing my five favorite finished works of his along with some images of his work in progress for you to see what I'm talking about. He almost always begins with the eyes and finishes with the clothing. His ability to render hair is beyond compare. My mind is blown and after viewing these yours will be, too.

Mana
His second drawing of model Mana.
Medium: Graphite pencils/Charcoal/black coloured pencil/on sketching paper.
Pencil brand - Faber-Castell
Paper type - Acid Free Cartridge paper 17 x 24 inches


In progress:


Final drawing of Mana on board:


"Undeviating" (Emmanuel)
A drawing of model Emmanuel, entitled "Undeviating"
Medium: Graphite pencils/black charcoal/black coloured pencil/on sketching paper.
Pencil brand - Faber-Castell
Paper type - Acid Free Cartridge paper 18 x 22 inches


In progress:


Final drawing of Undeviating (Emmanuel) on board:


Aisha II
His second drawing of Aisha.
Medium: Graphite pencils/black charcoal/black coloured pencil/on sketching paper.
Pencil brand - Faber-Castell
Paper type - Acid Free Cartridge paper 17 x 24 inches


In progress:



Final drawing of Aisha II on board:


"Timeless" (Jamal)
A drawing of model Jamal, entitled "Timeless."
Medium: Graphite pencils/black charcoal/black coloured pencil/on sketching paper.
Pencil brand - Faber-Castell
Paper type - Acid Free Cartridge paper 17 x 24 inches

In progress:



Final drawing of Timeless (Jamal) on board:


Adam II
His second drawing of Adam.
Medium: Graphite pencils/black charcoal/black coloured pencil/on sketching paper.
Pencil brand - Faber-Castell
Paper type - Acid Free Cartridge paper 15 x 24 inches


In progress:



Final drawing of Adam II on board:


Kelvin is a graduate from Middlesex University with a B.A. (Hon)s in Fine Art. On his flickr profile he claims that "He aspires to create art as vivid as eyes could see."

I think he's done it.

See all of his work over here on his flickr account. 

A big thanks to Vicki Mayer for bringing Kelvin's work to my attention.

7 comments:

nathabali said...

So realistic, unbeliveable !

Jim King said...

I just wonder what the point of this type of thing is, really. It's obviously very well done, but it's not like you'd ever mistake it for a photo or for reality (no "photorealism" paintings can look like reality, either, which I guess is why it's called photorealism). If it doesn't achieve that, then why not go for something less realistic but which has some emotion to it? This is emotionally blah. You look at it, admire the technique, but then forget it because it doesn't say anything to you - it tells us nothing about this guy, or anything else. Might as well have just taken a picture.

Now, I certainly admire the technique. It's not something anyone could do, it takes a lot of training to acquire that kind of ability, and just to execute is probably...well, many hours, who knows how many. But the skill required to do something, and the time it takes, don't really matter - the result is what matters and I don't think the result is worth the effort.

Anonymous said...

you miss the point. The point is not to introduce artifacts into the rendering of life but to capture it in all its glory. Emotion is already inherent in life. What better way to show emotion than to capture people so accurately that you can see every pore?

Jim King said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jim King said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
matt dickinson said...

These are amazingly good! Look at the hair around her neck in the second one -- so much detail! Very impressed.

Kelly Patterson said...

quite remarkable i'd say ... and some truly have a very close brush with "proto-realism", very close ... i drew in grade school and high school, pencil was always my favorite and mainly what i worked with, and portraits like these were usually what i attempted ... from a photograph usually, which i could accomplish rather wett, but not very often from a live subject which i never accomplished nearly as well ... i suppose that is both from familiarity of working mainly with photos as well as the 2-d look already on the print ... even a color photograph i was not as good at as with a b&w photo ... actually there was less problem with color photos of still life (the classic bowl of fruit type of thing) than with color photos of people ... strange ... i should have kept it up ...

but this gentleman's work is excellent and would make a fine gift for a loved one i think ... a drawing of the loved one i mean ... or perhaps of a wedding photo, etc ... the flaws are there, i assume they are the usual skin blemishes we all have here and there, and unlike many artists, he doesn't cover them up (or doesn't look as if he does at least) ...

i was a history major in college and someone once asked the prof that without photography at certain time periods or any photos of the person and only drawings or paintings were avialable, can we really know what the person looked like ... the prof's 'rule of thumb' was to use the 'least flattering' artistic rendering of that person ad that was probably the closest to how that person truly looked (given that it wasn't a lack of talent that was holding the quality of rendering back) ... i still think of that looking at old paintings, etc, and have to say i'm sure it's probably the best rule of thumb to go by ... he also added tho that the artist was usually being paid by the subject, certainly the famous subjects, and a better-looking rendering might garner the artist a bit more on the payment end when it was all said and done ;)

great site and thanks again for sharing the shared link :)

C'mon people, it's only a dollar.
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

http://www.madisonstyle.com/womens-shoesMattel delivers play every day - Shop online at Mattel Shop!




Press And Advertising

Please go here to learn about this blog's demographics and advertising opportunities.
Creative Commons License The images, text and information by laura sweet on this site are licensed and protected under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. If you reproduce or re-purpose, be sure to credit this blog and link back to the post. Thanks.